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  2. halftheskymovement:

    Columbia University students led a demonstration last Friday in support of Emma Sulkowicz, a Columbia senior who pledges to carry a mattress around campus until her alleged rapist is no longer permitted to be a student at the school. The protest, which condemned Columbia’s handling of sexual violence on campus, saw roughly 50 other survivors of sexual violence speak out — several for the first time. 

    A coalition of student groups also delivered a letter to Columbia administration proposing reforms that will improve the university’s response to sexual assault on campus. Their demands include ongoing programming on consent education and a release of the data on how students convicted of sexual violence on campus were punished.  

    Read more via Huffington Post

    (via america-wakiewakie)

     
  3. alqphoto:

     Andrew Quesada

    (via kid-adobo)

     
  4. jambo-rosa:

    Alfredo Ramos Martinez, Casamiento Indio, II, 1934
    oil on canvas

    (via kid-adobo)

     
  5. america-wakiewakie:

    Occupy abolishes $4 million in other people’s student loan debt | CNN

    After forgiving millions of dollars in medical debt, Occupy Wall Street is tackling a new beast: student loans.

    Marking the third anniversary of the Occupy Wall Street movement, the group’s Strike Debt initiative announced Wednesday it has abolished $3.8 million worth of private student loan debt since January. It said it has been buying the debts for pennies on the dollar from debt collectors, and then simply forgiving that money rather than trying to collect it.

    In total, the group spent a little more than $100,000 to purchase the $3.8 million in debt.

    While the group is unable to purchase the majority of the country’s $1.2 trillion in outstanding student loan debt because it is backed by the federal government, private student debt is fair game.

    This debt Occupy bought belonged to 2,700 people who had taken out private student loans to attend Everest College, which is run byCorinthian Colleges. Occupy zeroed in on Everest because Corinthian Colleges is one of the country’s largest for-profit education companies and has been in serious legal hot water lately.

    Following a number of federal investigations, the college told investors this summer that it plans to sell or close its 107 campuses due to financial problems — potentially leaving its 74,000 students in a lurch.

    (Read Full Text) (Photo Credit: US Uncut)

    (via cultureofresistance)

     
  6. pag-asaharibon:

    not-your-asian-fantasy:

    Early Feminism in the Philippines

    The Philippines has been noted as having one of the smallest gender disparities in the world. The gender gap has been closed in both health and education; the country has had two female presidents (Corazon Aquino from 1986-1992 and Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo from 2001-2010); and had its first woman Supreme Court justice (Cecilia Muñoz Palma in 1973) before the United States had one (Sandra Day O’Connor in 1981). These achievements reflect a long history of efforts by women to involve themselves equally in governance as well as in society.

    I was expecting a little bit more from the post and was suprised a few of these Filipinas were left out:

    • Gabriela Silang a revolutionary – a representation of female bravery – who fought against Spanish colonialism in the 18th century. Silang was a contrast to the chaste and religiously devout image of the Filipino lady as portrayed by Jose Rizal through his Spanish-language novels, Noli Me Tangere and El Filibusterismo
    • Clemencia Lopez became the first Filipino to enter the White House and the first to testify before a U.S. Senate hearing as a representative of her subjugated people.
    • Sofia Reyes de Veyra an educator, social worker and first secretary and co-founder (with Mary E. Coleman) of Asociacion Feminista Filipinathe first women’s club in the Philippines. Its establishment in June 1905 marked the start of the Feminist Movement in the country. She also organized the Manila Women’s Club which later became the nucleus of the National Federation of Women’s Clubs. This federation was in the forefront of the campaign to give women the right to vote and other rights. The women of the Philippines won these rights in 1931.
    • Dr. Carol Pagaduan-Araullo an UP cum laude graduate, medical doctor, 2012 UP Distinguished Alumni awardee and Bagong Alyansang Makabayan (BAYAN) chairperson. While Dr. Araullo was UP Student Council vice chairman and an activist imprisoned for opposing martial law.

    Unabridged version of Hercules, California Councilmember Myrna de Vera’s speech, delivered during the 2012 Filipina Women’s Network’s 100 Most Influential Filipina Women of the US

    Philippines was ranked 3rd highest in Asia Pacific region for gender equality according to the Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement report released by global financial firm MasterCard. Yet there’s still PH laws that are unfair to women.

    Articles 

    Books

    chidtalk’s recommendations

    Tumblr posts

    (via cultureofresistance)

     
  7. huffingtonpost:

    10 Stories That Prove Study Abroad Changes You In The Best Possible Way

    I was privileged enough to study abroad.  I loved every single moment.  Even the tough parts. That experience changed me for the better…

     
  8. quietandsarcastic:

    Read it again:  EVERY.  SINGLE.  REPUBLICAN.  Yes, that includes women. 

    (via kid-adobo)

     
  9. I love my skin!

    So do I.

    (Source: arthaemisia, via dynamicafrica)

     
  10. (via petalya)